bloodpressure

Blood Pressure Monitor Facts




Many people have to take and record blood pressure on a daily basis. If this is the case, they will likely own one of several different kinds of blood pressure equipment or a blood pressure monitor to record that information. Today, there are several different kinds of medical equipment that can perform this task.

Blood pressure is recorded by measuring systolic (when the heart contracts to force blood through the circulatory system) and diastolic (when the heart muscles relax between beats) pressure through the use of a blood pressure monitor. Not too long ago, a stethoscope was also needed to take a blood pressure reading, but today, technology has made that piece of equipment obsolete, at least in regard to obtaining some blood pressure readings.

Blood pressure readings are important because they can discover high blood pressure caused by clogged arteries or abnormal heart rhythms. The higher blood pressure is, the more often it needs to be checked. That's where a blood pressure monitor comes in.

One type of blood pressure monitor is worn on the wrist. This handy piece of medical ingenuity does away with the old fashioned system of cuffs, stethoscopes and inflatable balls and cords. The wristband style blood pressure monitor is digital and slides over the base of the wrist. 

Another type of monitor is the finger blood pressure monitor which some people report is not as accurate as other equipment. But you can't go wrong if you take whatever monitor you buy to your family doctor to test its accuracy.


Like the older style of blood pressure monitor, the wristband style also records systolic and diastolic blood pressure readings and then displays them in large, digital numerals on the face of the monitor. This type of blood pressure monitor records the pulse rate of the wearer and is able to record up to thirty readings a day. This type of blood pressure monitor is battery operated and can be purchased for a reasonable $50.

Another kind of blood pressure monitor is the 'old fashioned' kind, which comes with an aneroid monitor. This is the kind of blood pressure monitor utilizes a blood pressure cuff that is wrapped around the upper arm. An electric cuff assembly will work automatically at the press of a button.

Another type of monitor is the finger blood pressure monitor which some people report is not as accurate as other equipment. But you can't go wrong if you take whatever monitor you buy to your family doctor to test its accuracy.


A 'manual' method has a blood pressure cuff that operates by air pumped through a rubber bulb. This causes the blood pressure cuff to tighten and temporarily restrict blood flow to the arm. The old fashioned kind of blood pressure monitor can be purchased for about $20-$30 dollars in most medical supply stores. Many people not specially trained in the use and readings of an aneroid blood pressure monitor find them difficult to use.

In addition, some elderly patients find the rubber bulb difficult to squeeze. This type of blood pressure monitor isn't a wise choice for those that are hard of hearing, as this blood pressure monitor requires one to listen for the sounds of systolic and diastolic pressure during the reading.

A digital blood pressure monitor may be easier for some patients to use, and many models come with an option that allows a blood pressure reading printout. These models also typically come with a stethoscope and gauge as part of one unit and inflation can be either automatic or manual. Deflation is automatic in this type of blood pressure monitor.

One disadvantage to this type of blood pressure monitor is that it is sensitive to body movements, which can alter the reading, as can an irregular heart beat. However, practice at using it will help alleviate such concerns. These models range from about $30 to $100, but convenience and user-friendly features make this a blood pressure monitor of choice among high blood pressure patients today.

One other type of monitor is the finger blood pressure monitor which some people report is not as accurate as other equipment. But you can't go wrong if you take whatever monitor you buy to your family doctor to test its accuracy.


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